November 12, 2018

GUERNSEY, WYOMING

Population 1,147. I got to visit this little town today and meet a few people. They dont lock their cars or house doors, wave at you, the senior center is packed with all ages at lunchtime. People really care about each other. It’s so refreshing to see a little piece of Americana like this still exists. The best burger in town is at a place called Ben’s Bar.

Image titleImage title

Ben’s Bar, Guernsey Wyoming.

Image titleImage title

Image titleImage title

Danille Martinez, Bartender.

Image titleImage title

Image titleImage title

The Senior Center in Guernsey.

Image titleImage title

Custom Saddle made by local saddlemaker Wes Reyher.

Image titleImage title

Wes Reyher in his shop the Big Lonely Saddlery in Guernsey Wyoming

Guernsey is famous for what is termed the “point of convergence”. On the edge of town the Oregon, Mormon, California, Montana and Texas trail and Pony Express all converge and one can still see the wagon wheel ruts. From the 1830’s until 1870 it’s believed over 500,000 immigrants converged at this one spot heading west.

Image titleImage title



Click for larger version



Image titleImage title

In 1851 Elder Hosea Horn wrote in his Guide from Council Bluffs to Sacramento one of the earliest descriptions. “The rocks here form a gateway through which the road passes. The descent through these rocks was about a quarter of a mile in length. At the bottom, Thissell came upon great piles of bacon and flour, piled higher than my head, a notice on every pile. “This is clean help yourself”….here in one pile was more than five tons of flour and bacon, left behind the lighten up loads. This the Indians would not eat for fear of poison”.

Image titleImage title

Image titleImage title

Wagon wheel ruts carved into sandstone, Guernsey Wyoming.

Why you might ask do they converge here, well one reason in additional to protection form Fort Laramie ( not getting scalped or attacked by Grizzly bears) Guernsey sits in Wyoming’s banana belt. Saddlemaker Wes Reyher describes this weather phenomena below.



Previous:Notes from the Oregon trail
Next:Wyoming